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Buy Oranges !!EXCLUSIVE!!


A 10 lb. crate of our Arizona Navel Oranges contains approximately 1 dozen pieces of fresh citrus fruit. You can also purchase 20 lb., 30 lb., or 40 lb. boxes depending on your citrus needs. You can pre-order oranges from our online store at any time, however, we ship our citrus only when it is in season from December through the end of the Arizona citrus season.




buy oranges


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That the cultivation of Valencia oranges had a good future in Europe was realised by the generations of our grandparents back in the 1850's, because before they did not grow oranges for export, they only grew oranges for the markets in the area. Transport was also a problem, because in those years exports by ship were beginning, and later by rail, due to the demand in Europe for Valencian oranges, Valencian farmers began to plant more orange groves, an orange tree takes about 5 years to be in good orange production.


Blood oranges might sound unappetizing, but they earned that name because of the vivid red color of their flesh. The fruit is similar in taste and texture to a regular orange, but unlike traditional oranges, blood oranges aren't available year round. That's because they rely on certain kinds of weather to develop their red color. Get all the facts so you know when to hit your local grocery store for a blood orange or two.


Blood oranges are in season from December through May, though the exact months vary depending on what type of blood orange you're buying. The Moro variety is available from December through March, while the Tarocco is available from January through May. Blood oranges are readily available during these winter and spring months because the climate where the fruit trees grow plays a role in the formation of the red hue, according to the National Gardening Association. The temperature is thought to play a part in the darkness of the red color and how pronounced it is, but the exact temperature requirements remain unknown, the National Gardening Association reports.


The red color of blood oranges is due to the presence of anthocyanins, which are compounds that give many other fruits and vegetables their red, blue or purple colors, as well. Harvesting blood oranges at the peak of freshness ensures the maximum amount of anthocyanins in the fruit. Waiting until the winter and spring ensures that the blood oranges will be as vividly hued as possible, and the darker the color, the more anthocyanins the fruit contains. Anthocyanins might help prevent cancer and heart disease, as well as treat eye disorders, according to a 2004 article published in the "Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology."


If you seek out blood oranges, you're doing something good for your health. Blood oranges are a rich source of fiber, a nutrient that helps prevent constipation. Fiber might also decrease your risk of health problems such as heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. The fruit also supplies a healthy dose of vitamin C, which can help protect you from infection. Blood oranges supply small doses of protein, as well as potassium for a normal heartbeat and folate, which can prevent birth defects.


Buy blood oranges that are heavy for their size and that are firm to the touch. Pass on blood oranges that have soft or spongy spots on the rind. Store the fruit in the refrigerator and it'll last for about two weeks. When eating the fruit, don't peel off the white pith because it supplies a good amount of fiber. Add chopped blood oranges to fruit salad or juice the fruit as a colorful replacement to your usual fresh-squeezed orange juice. Dice blood oranges and add them to your favorite fruit salsa recipe as another way to incorporate them into your diet.


Did you ever try to buy oranges in Florida? I just got back from a nice midwinter break down in the Sunshine State and, although I have been going there for years, my attention was really focused this time on how expensive and lousy Florida oranges are if you try to buy them locally.


Florida is a huge citrus producer, so you'd think it would be easy to get a good, tasty, cheap orange. The state produces about 65% of the total citrus production in the United States. But, no way: The oranges you find there are expensive and taste like Styrofoam.


Florida oranges are expensive and of such poor quality (I am talking about the locally grown crop) because all the good ones are "exported" to other areas of the country like New York, Minnesota or Maine, for example. That leaves the poorer-quality ones for local consumption and their supply is relatively limited, so prices tend to be higher. Call it export-driven inflation.


While exporting oranges might create some jobs in Florida, the economy loses something of equal if not greater value, which is the real output. (The oranges!) That's shipped away to "foreigners" in other parts of the country or world. Local residents and workers must then spend their earnings to purchase and consume what they have already produced and shipped away. It doesn't make much sense.


At the time of publication, Norman had no positions in the stocks mentioned.","articleImageUrl":"","isExternalContributor":false,"publishDate":new Date(1423769400000),"primaryAuthorUrl":"/author/1307193/mike-norman/all.html","siteName":"Real Money","mediumThumbUrl":"","leadTicker":"[]","categoryName":"RealMoney.com","publishDateFormatted":"2015-02-12T14:30:00.000Z","compactPubDate":"2:30 PM","numPages":1,"subcategoryName":"US Equity - RM ","lastPublishDate":"2015-02-12T14:30:00.000-0500","pages":"0":"number":1,"pageTitle":"Don't Buy Oranges in Florida - RealMoney","isLastPage":true,"body":" Did you ever try to buy oranges in Florida? I just got back from a nice midwinter break down in the Sunshine State and, although I have been going there for years, my attention was really focused this time on how expensive and lousy Florida oranges are if you try to buy them locally. Florida is a huge citrus producer, so you'd think it would be easy to get a good, tasty, cheap orange. The state produces about 65% of the total citrus production in the United States. But, no way: The oranges you find there are expensive and taste like Styrofoam. Then it dawned on me that Florida is a good example of what an export economy looks like. I thought I'd use this to show why most people have it wrong about exports and imports. We are constantly told that exports are the way to grow the economy and we need to be \"competitive.\" That is the refrain we hear over and over again. But the reality is, exports are actually a cost and imports are a benefit. Florida oranges are expensive and of such poor quality (I am talking about the locally grown crop) because all the good ones are \"exported\" to other areas of the country like New York, Minnesota or Maine, for example. That leaves the poorer-quality ones for local consumption and their supply is relatively limited, so prices tend to be higher. Call it export-driven inflation. Ironically, if you want a nice, tasty navel orange to eat, you'll probably find one in the supermarket, where it most likely was imported from California or Brazil. While exporting oranges might create some jobs in Florida, the economy loses something of equal if not greater value, which is the real output. (The oranges!) That's shipped away to \"foreigners\" in other parts of the country or world. Local residents and workers must then spend their earnings to purchase and consume what they have already produced and shipped away. It doesn't make much sense. However, this is what export economies tend to look like. They're \"short\" the supply of whatever it is they're exporting, making those products more expensive in local terms. That's the same as getting a pay cut. If a nation's or a state's goal is to create jobs, it's much better to ensure that domestic workers have sufficient income to consume whatever they need to consume at the best price, even if that means importing. That ensures that the utility of their labor is going as far as it can go. To state it another way, they get a greater share of real wealth per hour of labor. Exporting your product rarely accomplishes that. That's why exports should be considered a cost and imports a benefit, at least in real terms. Economies that rely on exports for growth usually see reduced quantities of the real goods along with higher prices and lower wages paid to their workers. In the case where wages are not lowered, there is usually some form of government support or subsidy (essentially a tax on workers) to sustain competitive advantage. Too bad our policy makers don't understand this as they try relentlessly to turn us into an export nation. It just creates more pressure that drives wealth inequality. ","isFirstPage":true,"url":"/articles/02/12/2015/dont-buy-oranges-florida","tier":"code":1,"name":"silver","subcategoryId":1290269,"id":13708128,"relatedStories":,"headline":"Don't Buy Oranges in Florida","contentType":"Text","headlineTwitter":"Don't Buy Oranges in Florida","smallThumbUrl":"","siteCode":"RMY","isVideo":false,"authorId":1307193,"largeThumbUrl":"","headlineFacebook":"Don't Buy Oranges in Florida","url":"/articles/02/12/2015/dont-buy-oranges-florida","tags":"[\"path\":\"investing\",\"name\":\"Investing\",\"id\":144,\"searchable\":true,\"categoryId\":2798933,\"path\":\"investing/us-equity\",\"name\":\"U.S. Equity\",\"id\":350,\"searchable\":true,\"categoryId\":2798952,\"path\":\"investing/consumer-staples\",\"name\":\"Consumer Staples\",\"id\":236,\"searchable\":true,\"categoryId\":2798959]","publishDateAsString":"Feb 12, 2015 2:30 PM EST","subcategorySlug":"usequity","channels":"[\"name\":\"Investing\",\"id\":2798933,\"name\":\"Consumer Staples\",\"id\":2798959]","isBrandedView":false,"authorName":"Mike Norman","primaryTag":"Consumer Staples","isPremium":true,"authors":"[\"name\":\"Mike Norman\",\"id\":1307193]"}; Keystone.articleModelData = article: articleModel ; })(); About Privacy Terms of Use 1996-2023 TheStreet, Inc., 225 Liberty Street, 27th Floor, New York, NY 10281 041b061a72


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